Stem Cells and the Inflammatory Process

14 09 2010

Tonight we are going to briefly cover the topic of stem cells and the inflammatory process. The word inflammation comes from the Latin inflammatio, which means “to set on fire.” Most people associate it with skin that becomes red, painful and swollen after they get a bug bite or a splinter. Those are common symptoms of acute inflammation.

The inflammatory response is a normal process, and an important mechanism for health; without it, wounds and tissues would not heal. But as with most physiological functions, it is vital that there is a balance. Unfortunately, inflammation that becomes chronic is one of the most troublesome processes in the body.

Chronic inflammation causes significant disruption of the normal functions of cells and – unlike acute inflammation – is usually silent, invisible and persistent. We can’t see it or feel it, but it can cause a host of health-related problems that plague today’s society.

One of the reasons chronic inflammation is such a problem is that it appears to interfere with the ability of your adult stem cells – your body’s natural agents of renewal – to do their job.  Scattered chronic inflammation at the cellular level makes it difficult for your stem cells to know where they are needed, because cells everywhere appear to be signaling them. Kind of like trying to hear someone in the middle of a stadium full of people who are all shouting at the same time.

Causes of chronic inflammation include the persistent presence of pathogens, environmental pollutants, negative genetic factors and lifestyle, among other things. While not all of these causes are within our control, some definitely are. For instance, lifestyle factors that create inflammation include poor sleep, lack of exercise, chronic stress and an inflammatory diet.

Inflammatory diets are those high in saturated fats, trans fats (hydrogenated or partially hydrogenated oils),  margarines, alcohol, artificial sweeteners, dairy products, soda (diet and regular), well cooked red meat, MSG, nuts (except almonds and walnuts), white and brown sugar, and white flours.

Anti-inflammatory foods include vegetables (especially dark leafy greens), fish and fish oils, flax seeds, flaxseed oil, fruit (especially pineapple, mango and papaya), oats, olive oil, brown seaweed and barley.

Obviously, you can significantly improve your quality of life by living an anti-inflammatory lifestyle. However, a more practical alternative in today’s helter-skelter world is to take Aphanizomenon flos-aquae (AFA) concentrate, which gives extra support to your natural stem cell renewal system.  Our flagship product, StemEnhance, could be just the solution you are looking for.

A recently published study showed an increase in circulating stem cells of 25% with just 2 capsules of this AFA concentrate daily.

Disclaimer: This article is for educational purposes only and does not constitute medical advice. The opinions expressed herein are those of the author and any products mentioned, while supported by science, are not intended to diagnose, mitigate or treat any disease or illness.

For more information and to learn about financial opportunities available in the exciting stem cell arena – visit: www.hawgwash.stemtechbiz.com or contact Holly at 480-688-2343

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